About your Search

20130416
20130424
STATION
CNNW 2
KQED (PBS) 2
KRCB (PBS) 2
CNBC 1
CSPAN2 1
MSNBCW 1
LANGUAGE
English 16
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
made without a miranda warning or made while he's not really competent between times when he's sedated and not sedated. so they may be risking their death penalty, but they may be doing it for a good reason. they may need realtime intelligence, but i don't think that the public safety exception will stand up for allowing them not to have given the miranda warnings. >> fascinating. in fact, i have a lot of questions about that i'm going to get to. and actually i want to bring in another colleague as well right now. steve razor is a former military judge advocate general and knows a thing or two about this military issue. typically, steve, we hear about a 48-hour window and this is a very new area of justice. this has only been in sort of parlay for the last couple of years. we are far outside of that 48 hours by today. but can it be extended in the case of public safety? and exactly when can you establish that a public safety exemption has expired or is no longer of concern? how long can you keep him from getting miranda? >> well, there's no hard and fast rule on that. and that's exactl
, but a gunshot wound to the neck left him unable to speak. it was unclear if he was read his miranda rights. but in washington, white house spokesman jay carney said he's a naturalized u.s. citizen, so he will not face a military tribunal. >> he will not be treated as an enemy combatant. we will prosecute this terrorist through our civilian system of justice, under us law. u.s. citizen can not be trialed, tried rather in military commissions. and it's important to remember that since 9-11 we have used the federal court system to convict and incarcerate hundreds of terrorists. >> brown: tsarnaev was also likely to face state charges in the shooting death of a police officer at m.i.t. it all followed his dramatic capture friday evening, when he was found hiding and wounded in a boat behind a home in the boston suburb of watertown. his older brother tamarlen died hours earlier in a shoot-out with police that triggered the all-day manhunt and shut down the city. yesterday, on cbs, massachusetts governor deval patrick stood by the unprecedented measures. >> i think people understood that we were
his miranda rights, read miranda rights just getting that as you were wrapping up. adam housley live in boston. adam, thank you. investigators are furiously trying to track down the terrorism connection to this case. and they are focusing on a trip, the older brother made last year. chief intelligence correspondent catherine herridge is here tonight with an update on that. good evening, catherine. >> thank you, bret. some of the most compelling evidence and preliminary evidence comes from surveillance video and one eyewitness during that carjacking thursday night before a shootout with police one of the brothers said, quote: did you hear about the boston explosion? i did that. court records filed monday show the tsarnaev brothers walked into boylston street together 11 minutes before the explosions, each with a backpack. they split up. one heading for the finish line and the other toward the forum restaurant, the site of the second explosion. 30 seconds before the first blast. the started fidgeting with cell phone after the blast almost everyone turned around, quote: apparent bewil
whether he should be read his miranda rights. >> you're giving them the option, as to whether or not they want to cooperate and i don't believe they should have that option. this is sole will i for the purpose of interrogation to find intelligence to get the intelligence that i believe we need. >> questions remain -- did the brothers have help in carrying out their attacks? >> we're satisfied that the two actors here, the two people that were committing the damage have either been arrested or killed. and the people of the city of boston can rest comfortably at this point in time. >>> but did the fbi miss warning signs after interviewing 26-year-old tamerlan tsarnaev in 2011? where did the brothers get their guns? their training? and their inspiration? >>> in washington, the boston terror attack could become an excuse to slow down immigration reform. >> if ways to improve the bill offered amendment when we start mark-up in may and let's vote on it. i say that particularly those pointing to what happened, the terrible tragedy in boston as a -- i would say excuse for not doing th
with as a consequence as an enemy combatant or enemy belligerent which would involve delaying his miranda rights. >> you don't want to turn over intelligence gathering over to a criminal attorney. under the law, there is no right to legal counsel when you are egg being questioned for national security purposes. i hope the obama administration will allow us that and they have a bad track record. >> and this is not the course the administration will take. they will take reading him his rights after national security exception has run out and prosecuting him in a federal court as well. >> molly: thank you. >> megyn: more breaking news. news reporting that federal charges have now been filed against the surviving suspect. though they are reportedly being filed under seal. that means we don't get to see them. they will have to let it's know what the charges are but perhaps not all the supporting information. in a case of this magnitude there is no way they are going to keep the charges private and not public. in other words, what exactly has he been charged with? a terrorist act, using weapons of mass destru
and that led to life in prison. >> john: this brings new elements to us. not being a lawyer, the miranda exception to be used on the suspect only if a terror threat seems emanant. can you explain how that works and has that been tested in court before? >> sure, the public safety exemption to miranda allows the fbi to interrogate without mirandaizeing them an without council. this helps them to determine whether or not there is anyone else in the support structure as tim clemente discussed earlier, if there are any support structure and it does present a potential problem a potential evidentiary problem for prosecution at trial in so far a federal judge could decide certain evidence is not admissible in court. but when you look at the massive amount of evidence that has been amassed in this case it's unlikely that they would not be able to get a conviction. it makes sense that they would proceed on this basis empty with the concern of a possible international connection. >> and they miranda mirandaized tim mcveigh but they didn't have as much and he didn't present as a foreign threat. i'v
gathering purposes since he's been president. when we read these people their miranda rights and give them a lawyer the only way you can gather intelligence is if the terror suspect and the lawyer will allow you to do so. intelligence gathering through plea bargaining is not going to make us safe. jenna: so we spoke to a former member of the fbi on our show yesterday that seems to not have a problem with miranda rights, that is their opinion. we'll see what they get as far as information from this one suspect. >> can i mention something. jenna: please. >> i don't have a problem with miranda rights. this man can only be tried in federal court. he's never eligible for military commissions. a first year law student could convict this person. what i'm worried about is what does he know about future attacks? he's telling us that his brother was the bad guy, he's sort of just along for the ride. they had no international connections. guess what, he's down-playing his involvement. what i am suggesting is that we use the national security legal system where we can interview him without a lawyer to
this suspect, they'll read the miranda rights and all of that. they're going to try to find out if this individual who has now been arrested acted alone as a so-called lone wolf or was part of some broader conspiracy, walk us through what the fbi is about to do. >> sure. well, wolf, they will -- they will take him into custody, they will give him his miranda rights because they want to be sure any statement the individual may make is admissible in court during the prosecution. if the individual agrees to talk, there will be -- they will take a statement and they will also likely confront him with forensic evidence and things that they have learned, photographs, they will ask him to identify how he constructed the bomb, how he knew to construct the bomb, who, if anyone, he worked with, who he communicated with, they'll want to -- they will want to make sure to take when he's arrested any cell phones, blackberries, pocket litter, pieces of paper, notebooks he may have on him and they'll want to have him retrace for them his steps. they will then send other investigators out to try
is a key word here. the administration has ruled out using that term. i am informed, joe, that miranda was -- the suspect was mirandized today. i don't know exactly what that means. it doesn't sound like they will have enough elbow room to ask questions. what is your take? >> what happens was there was resentment in the hospital today where a u.s. magistrate average, prosecutor and a public defender were in attendance, in explaining the charges to the defendant, he was told he had the right to remain silent, that an attorney would be provided for him and he was asked if he understood those things. he did. he was told he did not have to make any statements. so the so-called period in which they were going to glean all of this intelligence from him has ended. if he chooses to speak, it will, no doubt, be over the objection of his public defender and now that he's lawyered up, my guess is that the talking is over. >> was this a mistake in i mean, a lot of people calling for enemy combatant status. that would have given a lot more time for questioning. he can be brought back into the feder
with american citizens. it allows the justice department to delay reading a suspect his miranda rights if doing so is in the interest of -- quote -- "public safety." the administration had rightly invoked this public safety exception in the case of the boston suspect which provided our national security professionals a discreet period of time to gather intelligence from the suspect without the presence of his lawyer. however, soon after questioning him this way, the administration recently reversed itself and read the suspect his miranda rights. in doing so, the administration, in my view, gave up a valuable opportunity to lawfully and thoroughly question the suspect for purposes of gathering intelligence about potential future terrorist plots. whether we will be able to acquire such information has now been left entirely at the discretion of the suspect and his lawyer. put simply, the suspect has been told he has the right to remain silent, and if he doesn't want to provide intelligence, he doesn't have to. is this a responsible balance between a citizen's rights and our national security? the
, about miranda warnings, about habeas corpus, how fast do we have to release him or how fast do we have to put them in front of a judge or how long can we keep them and question them? >> bill: these are all great points. let me slow you down just a moment here. >> sure. sorry. >> bill: if you want -- if you want to go out and make an arrest, perhaps you have your eye on someone and you got a street address, apartment number. but maybe there is more than one person. maybe there is two or three. and there is a real danger in putting out public information. if you could be showing your hand and tipping off others that could be people that you want to talk to. that's the category and area that could be very dangerous. >> another possibility here is that the boston police department jumped the gun. the f.b.i., my understanding, is in control of the situation, and believe me, there is a real higher arcky throughout the country when the feds come in, they come in and they take over and they're the chain of command, they're at the top. if someone, some lower police officer blew -- said somethin
they not have read his miranda rights to him yesterday if that is the case? do you leave the door of legal opportunity open a while longer. >> there are two separate issues. the public safety exception applies regardless of the type of offense that the government is investigating, and using the public safety exception is recognized by the united states supreme court. it's a lawful way of trying to get information in a very short window of time tinge le particularly when you're concerned about public safety issues as the investigators certainly were as a result of the horrific acts that the bombing suspects, the bombing defendants who are h are accused of. bill: this is a guy to lived here more than ten years. came here 2002 if memory serves. your case with richard reid he was far from an american citizen, he was far from even making a home here. what have we done in 12 years? make sure that the prosecutions can be successful? >> i would suggest that we should be using all the tools that both the united states supreme court has indicated are available in order to keep america safe, and all
as this they wouldn't screw something like that up. >> stephanie: the miranda rights not being read right away -- clearly that was an emergency. perhaps i'm not as versed of my civil liberties as i should be. >> in danger of being punted. >> stephanie: exactly. >> talking to you sorority girl. >> stephanie: kevin in dc. welcome. >> caller: good morning. what a sight for sore eyes as always. i mean you're a sight for sore eyes -- >> stephanie: sure. all right. thank you. >> caller: sorry. it's early what do you want? [ laughter ] >> stephanie: uh-huh. >> caller: i was calling kind of in frustration. does everything have to be political? the boston tragedy, what has hand to those poor people i'm still horrified about it. but the caller that called you the day after and tried to ridiculously compare it to bush and the official that was babbled about the [ inaudible ] that had an ak 15. are these people human? how do we get to this point? i'm not all saying all democrats or liberals or progressives whatever you want to call it all have halos over their head but it appears to me we
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)